Defining sisterhood with goodness tour

Amanda Perrot had been on the road for 47 days with her Saskatchewan Sisterhood tour, an almost 5,300 kilometre trip around Saskatchewan with the sole purpose of spreading goodness.

The concept confused people, says Perrot, but she enjoyed that.

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They always thought I was selling something, she says.

Perrot wrapped up her tour with a stop at Brickhouse Clothing in Humboldt on Aug. 23 with over 50 women gathered to talk about what sisterhood means to them.

Perrot’s divorce from her husband last year kicked her in the butt, she says.

She started the road trip as a “personal adventure” to sightsee around the province, but the tour became more about connecting with people about their journeys and hosting 15 events, like the one in Humboldt to create some magic.

“By my calculations, I’ve met 1,000 women in person, which is a pretty big deal in a day where social media ranks high.”

One thing that Perrot learned on her trip was that some of the people with the most social media followers are not nice people, while others who have few followers are more personable and have the biggest hearts.

“Those are the people you want to connect with. That has been completely eye opening for me.”

Defining sisterhood was the main focus of the event and learning that many women are not alone in a lack of sisterhood in their lives.

For Saskatchewan Sisterhood panelist, Sarah Sand, close female friends can come and go as women move through their lives. For her, it is not always about the who is in our lives but the what is created between two people.

“It’s constantly this cycle of meeting new women and finding that camaraderies and then having it go. But that energy is still there…that feeling is something that I constantly long for.”

Fellow panelist, Audrey Tumback, did not have sisters or female friends close in age growing up but over her 80 plus years, she has filled her life with “people who became sisters by heart,” she says.

“And when I think of sisterhood I think of all these people in my life now that have made my life better by just being.”

Throughout the tour, Amanda has seen the number of people who want to connect with people. Everyone craves connection, she says, which can lead to both amazing and terrifying experiences. You just have to keep going, she says.

“I’ve seen amazing, brilliant, beautiful people around our province, but I have also seen a lot of jerks. When you put yourself out there, get out of your bubble, you see all of it…the good far outweighs the bad.”

Amanda will be taking her journey and writing a book about her experience this fall since she spent much of the tour coming up with chapters throughout the book.

© Copyright Humboldt Journal

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